2000-2001 Bieker3 i14 as a first boat. Is it worth it?

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Pitch Pole
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Boat Number: 1490

2000-2001 Bieker3 i14 as a first boat. Is it worth it?

Post by Pitch Pole » Mon Jun 05, 2017 11:20 am

Hi everyone,

I'm considering getting a Bieker 3 i14 from between 2000-2001. I have very little info at present about the rig, but from the few photos I've seen, the boat could use a few upgrades. Namely the mainsheet system, self-tacking jib (which is currently not present) as well the boom vang (which isn't reversed/ inverted). The full carbon hull has apparently been re-furbished with a new coat of deck grip, and a fresh re-spray on the hull. I can't speak for the layout of the control lines at this point. A T-foil rudder is also present in package.
My only reservation is that I have no experience with these boats and don't really know what to look out for when purchasing one. What are some issues to be weary of? Secondly, the extent of my skiff experience stems from sailing 29ers mostly, with the odd session on a 49er here and there a few years ago. Is the jump to a 14 doable? Any input on the above points of interest would be a great help as I am keen to join the community of this awesome class!

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rand
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Re: 2000-2001 Bieker3 i14 as a first boat. Is it worth it?

Post by rand » Mon Jun 05, 2017 1:07 pm

As a first boat? Yes, excellent choice.

She'll be faster than you for a while, how long depends on how much time you put into learning the boat. I bought my B3 new in 1999, she's still faster than I am :( at times faster than the new boats (not as often anymore though).

It all comes down to cost, how much is the present owner asking, how much do you think you'll need to put into it and when. If the sails are reasonable, then you can sail it for a while as is. Along the way you will learn A LOT about sailing a 14 as well as how you want it rigged, when lines are about to break (hopefully you replace them before they do). With a starter boat, making these changes is less painful than on a newer boat.

Do you need a self tacking jib and the crew trimming the main? Well no you don't. I've modernized the rig, sails and foils on my boat, but we're still old school on sail trimming, I even still have a cleat on my main sheet :shock:

Like any boat you can spend more money on it than you have, you just need to stick to your budget :)
Rand Arnold
International 14 USA 1143
"A Bumblebee Called Kate"
(former US President, former US Measurer)

Pitch Pole
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Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 8:44 am
Boat Number: 1490

Re: 2000-2001 Bieker3 i14 as a first boat. Is it worth it?

Post by Pitch Pole » Mon Jun 05, 2017 1:28 pm

Rand,
Thanks for the reply and the great key point of sticking to a budget (which due to a baby on the way will certainly be restricted). The main reason I jumped right to altering the mainsheet and installing a self-tacker was because of my experience with 9ers. With your set up, was it a bit tricky at first playing the main upwind? And does your boat have a raised foredeck with a middle ridge tapering downward toward the bow?

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rand
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Re: 2000-2001 Bieker3 i14 as a first boat. Is it worth it?

Post by rand » Mon Jun 05, 2017 3:00 pm

Rounding Red Rock.jpg
Photo © 2012, Spencer Allen
(Old rig and before we got the rudder foil)

Tricky? Hmm, I don't know I've never sailed a boat with the trimming reversed :lol:

My boat was the last B3 built before Paul sent the molds to England (a bunch more were built there).
Rand Arnold
International 14 USA 1143
"A Bumblebee Called Kate"
(former US President, former US Measurer)

mothra
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Re: 2000-2001 Bieker3 i14 as a first boat. Is it worth it?

Post by mothra » Tue Jun 13, 2017 2:52 am

I will second the suggestion that a B3 is a great first boat. I joined the fleet in a B3 two years ago. Two years later once we could get around the course in breeze, it became apparent that it was most likely our older foil designs, and not the hull that was the most limiting factor speed wise. Compared with some other I14 designs, the B3 is relatively forgiving, and it will likely come with a nice big rudder (training wheels). Rand is correct that the boat will be faster than you for some time. Spend the first year or so just keeping the boat upright (sailing), and not upgrading gear. Upgrading stuff takes time, and is better spent once you have sailed the boat enough to know what you want.

I started sailing a B5 this year and would suggest it is more difficult to sail, though much of this has to do with things other than the hull (smaller rudder, low boom).

14 helms who trim main are a dying breed, though some persist. There is a reason nearly everyone does it the other way.

I'd make the suggestion that you're best off buying a starter boat with a relatively simple rig, and modern sheeting systems to get the feel for it. Some 14s have ten control lines, and others are pinned rigs with a Cunningham and Vang. What they don't tell you, is that maintaining 10 systems takes a ton of time, and there are 10 more things that can break. Hard to fix things if you don't have experience fixing them.

Not that I'm biased, but my B3 is for sale elsewhere on the forum, and was an ideal starter boat for me (and coincidentally fits my description above). viewtopic.php?f=7&t=1887&p=8525#p8525

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