History of I14 US 112

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Markmuk
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History of I14 US 112

Post by Markmuk » Wed Jul 28, 2010 7:26 pm

I'm looking into the history of my recently acquired wooden I14, hull number #112. Sources in England suspect that the boat was built by Uffa Fox in the mid-late thirties, but I'd like to know when the boat was first registered here in the United States and received her US 112 sail numbers. Is there a US I14 class historian out there?

Thanks,
Mark

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rand
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by rand » Thu Jul 29, 2010 1:07 am

We (I) did have some history, but not going back that far. I have no idea where those files went when I passed them on.

But perhaps we can tease some info out.

It has been my wish for some time now to have a database of all boat info, but it has not been set up yet.
Rand Arnold
International 14 USA 1143
"A Bumblebee Called Kate"
(former US President, former US Measurer)

Markmuk
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by Markmuk » Thu Jul 29, 2010 2:14 am

Thanks, Rand

If my I14 #112 was built in the thirties in England, who knows when it made it's way to the USA and received its "US 112" sail numbers? No hurry - I intend to make her my Northwest Winter project, and display her at the wooden boat show on Lake Union in Seattle next 4th of July.

However, if you or anyone else might learn of something.......

Thanks,
Mark

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rand
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by rand » Thu Jul 29, 2010 3:07 am

She was likely built and then shipped to her US owner.

Makes me wonder what shipping was like in those days. Certainly not as easy as the containerized shipping we have today.
Rand Arnold
International 14 USA 1143
"A Bumblebee Called Kate"
(former US President, former US Measurer)

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Paul Galvez
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by Paul Galvez » Fri Jul 30, 2010 5:08 pm

Please post some pics of the boat here. I've seen my fair share of Uffa Fox boats and they are nothing short of art.

Ian_Robinson
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by Ian_Robinson » Fri Sep 17, 2010 3:58 am

Please pardon the interloping of a Flying Scot/Force 5 sailor who does not own but admires the I-14. I do not know if an I-14 sail number remains the same as the hull number like it is with Flying Scots and Thistles, but -- < IF > -- US 112 is the same as I-14 Hull # 112, I have some information for you.

According to T.J. Vaughan's tables in the an I-14 history book identified further below, I-14 Hull # 112 was designed by Mr. A.C. Walker of Lee, U.K., built by him in 1926, and allocated to the Benfleet Yacht Club, U.K. It sounds like you have a very, very early I-14 and it should be a rare and interesting treasure.

The designer/builder Mr. Walker sailed its sister ship, Hull #111 ("Alsani"), at Cowes in 1927 at the first Prince of Wales Challenge Cup against notables which included Uffa Fox (#63 "Radiant") and Morgan Giles (#98 Vamoosa"). Atkey (#78 "Irex II") finished 1st, Fox finished 2nd; Giles finished 3rd. I can't tell you where #111 finished.

1928 was a year of significant change for the I-14s. Before this time, a lot of I-14s used a single gaff-rigged sail like today's Sunfish, although some sloop-rigged I-14s existed in the early teens of the 20th century. Uffa Fox's early boats had a jib. By 1928, the single sail was out and the sloop rig was in. However, the most significant change in 1928 was Uffa Fox's design for "Avenger" (Hull #135) which planed easily and set the standard for years to come. Your hull appears to pre-date these changes.

The information above came from a book containing a wealth of history about the International 14. The book is called The International 14 1928-1989, (Vaughan, T.J., The International Fourteen Dinghy Association of Great Britain, 1989). The book contains many photographs, drawings, lists, and other interesting bits of information while going through the history of the design changes. Certain chapters of this book (but not the photos, drawings, charts, or tables) are on line at:

http://gbr.international14.org/index.ph ... 6&Itemid=9

If you expand the view from a list of 10 to a list of 20, you will see all of the chapters available, but for the for the time period before 1928, see especially Chapter 2 at:

http://gbr.international14.org/index.ph ... y&Itemid=9


I hope this information is helpful to you.

Ian Robinson
Salem, Ohio

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rand
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by rand » Fri Sep 17, 2010 1:52 pm

The Fourteen does not now have an international numbering system. So as a boat moves from country to country it will pick up a new number each time. I don't know my US Fourteen history well enough to know if this has always been the case or not, but I suspect so.
Rand Arnold
International 14 USA 1143
"A Bumblebee Called Kate"
(former US President, former US Measurer)

Ian_Robinson
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by Ian_Robinson » Wed Sep 22, 2010 2:12 pm

@ Rand

Thank you for clearing that up Rand. So is it the case that there is also separate a hull number for the boats or are they referred to only by sail number?

@ Mark
Post by Markmuk » Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:26 pm:
"I'm looking into the history of my recently acquired wooden I14, hull number #112. Sources in England suspect that the boat was built by Uffa Fox in the mid-late thirties, but I'd like to know when the boat was first registered here in the United States and received her US 112 sail numbers. Is there a US I14 class historian out there?
Thanks,
Mark"

I was continuing to re-read the 14 book I referenced in an earlier post. I ran across a photograph of US 116 (that is very close to your sail number) with a caption stating:

"American Fourteen Foot One-Design. These boats were built from Alarm's lines in 1938. Being the first moulded Fourteens, and probably the first moulded boats in the world. In all, over a thousand boats have been taken from Alarm's lines in America, comprising 37 built in the traditional ribbed manner, 175 moulded 'One-Designs' and nearly 800 Jet Fourteens' a hybrid craft using Alarm's hull and a Snipe sail plan."

Alarm was K 347 designed and built by Uffa Fox in 1935.

Elsewhere in the book, the following history of the American "One-Design" production occurs:

"Overseas development through the 30's and early 40's continued apace both in Canada and America. Charles Bourke was the leading helmsman designer in Canada while in America the pace was set by Gordon (Sandy) Douglass. Gordon has achieved fame as a designer, builder and sailor of canoes. Through the 1930 International canoe matches in America and England, he became a great friend and admirer of Uffa Fox. The Rochester Gang of International Fourteen sailors; George Ford, Chuck Angle, Norm Cole and Lew Howard, unhappy with the quality of existing American built Fourteens observed the standard of Douglass Canoes, and asked him to build Fourteens for them to Alarms' lines. This he did with great success — some of his craft ending up on America's West Coast. In the early 40's he was the first Fourteen builder to appreciate the advantages of the recently introduced 'Vidal' method of moulding hulls. The cost of traditional ribbed Fourteens, with some 7000 copper rivets having to be hammered home for each hull, was already a problem. So he ordered from the US Plywood Corporation, what is believed to be the first moulded Fourteen. Again Alarm's lines were used and 25 US One Design Fourteen were taken from it before the mould was accidently destroyed. After the war another Alarm mould was constructed and 150 more One Designs' were taken from it. But under International competitive pressure, the One Design concept of America Fourteens started to break down as owners modified their craft to keep pace with the Canadian and British International Fourteens. 'Sandy' Douglass considered that toe straps were also wrong for general sailing as they limited the effectiveness of husband and wife teams. Allowing male crews to sit out and use their weight more effectively than their female counterparts! In any event in American the 'One Design' idea, while an outstanding success at the time, demonstrated another problem that is still with us, namely the need of a development class to restrict the speed of change to encourage professional builders. Builders need reasonable runs to allow them to recover their setting up costs. The problem is that this sometimes tends to turn the class temporarily into a 'One Design'. But to return to Sandy Douglass, the Alarm story was not over. The mould was sold to another builder and 800 more Alarm hulls were produced, but rigged with the popular America 'Snipe' sail plan and sold as the Jet 14 — thus the Alarm lines of the 1930's must be by far the most common hull of any Fourteen."

Gordon (Sandy) Douglass later designed and built the Thistle (a 17' open dinghy that has lines remarkably like the classic 14 represented by Alarm), the larger Highlander, and the Flying Scot.

I hope that this may shed some light on the history of your boat.

In the meantime, why don't tell us if your hull is ribbed or molded, and can you share a picture of its exterior & interior?

Ian Robinson
Salem, Ohio
Attachments
Uffa_Fox_Alarm_Hull_Design.JPG
Drawing of Uffa Fox's hull design for Alarm
US-116.jpeg
Photo of US-116

simonawatts
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by simonawatts » Sat Nov 19, 2011 5:20 am

Can't help you on US 112 but I have a clinker-built I-14 , vintage 1948, acquired from the Royal St. Lawrence Yacht Club in 1955. The boat is now beyond economical repair so I am building a new one, an exact copy. It was clumsily converted to a Jet-14 so I don't know what the original layout might have been. Anyone with any knowledge please get in touch. I'm in San Francico, and my email is: <simonawatts@earthlink.net>
Thanks,
S. Watts






i-014

Northshore Pirate
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by Northshore Pirate » Sun Nov 20, 2011 1:01 am

My father worked for Sandy Douglass and built the first Thistle prototype (Planked) which after sailing trials was burned. Thistle #1 was then built cold molded. Douglass & Mcleod is still in Grand River, Ohio and run by Ray Mcleod Jr. He might have some records. There is also a book "Sixty Years Behind the Mast" that Sandy wrote.

Northshore Pirate
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by Northshore Pirate » Sun Nov 20, 2011 1:11 am

You got me hunting, try this link. I am surprised the US 14 forum doesn't have this..

Northshore Pirate
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by Northshore Pirate » Sun Nov 20, 2011 1:12 am


sailingmaster
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Re: History of I14 US 112

Post by sailingmaster » Mon Jan 02, 2012 4:37 pm

IM eagerly reading thru all of these posts.

I am located in New England and Looking to find an old I14 frm the 60s'70s, prefer a hot moulded boat like a Fairey, McCutcheon, S Casson, etc, but will look and a good old glass boat as well. I know some old time 14 sailors and we have been tossing around the idea of a 'Classic" fleet on our local Lake. Someone has to be the trial horse, so I guess that is me.

If anyone knows the whereabouts of any or these boats feel free to shoot me an email at sailingmaster@me.com

Thanks

JP

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